Podcast Episode 002:My background, fundamental concepts and Q&A

Here’s episode two of my podcast: WDP 002: My background, fundamental concepts and Q&A

In this episode I give some background on my martial arts and self-defense training, explain fundamental concepts and also do a Q&A.

Sound quality isn’t optimal due to the recording equipment of this old webcast; the next episodes are much better so hang in there… :-)

Show Notes:
1. Introduction

2. Fundamental concepts.

3. Q & A. 24min,55Sec.

Thanks for listening!

Please like, share and leave a review!

If you want to support the podcast while also getting access to loads of unique content, go to my Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/wimdemeere

My podcast is live – Episode 1: What to expect from my podcast?

At long last, my podcast is live…

Thanks to the support of my Patrons, it is now available to everyone. Just some quick info:

  • The first episode explains what you can expect and has a Q&A section. This is what a “regular” episode will be like. I will alternate these with interviews with experts in all kinds of fields, though obviously martial arts and self-defense is the main focus. These will run anywhere between 30 and 60 min, sometimes a bit longer depending on availability.
  • The next three episodes are re-releases of the ones I did on my old webcast. If you haven’t heard those before, this is your chance to do so.
  • I’m going to publish all four episodes right away, one after the other, in separate blog posts. That way you can more easily see the show notes, which is where I put the links to resources or things mentioned in each episode.
  • I just submitted the show to iTunes and Stitcher. I should have confirmation from them in a few days. When I do, I’ll add the “subscribe” feature to the player.
  • If you don’t have an app right now: I use Podcast Addict on my Android phone and apparently this one is best for iPhone. You can use these apps to automatically download the latest episodes and listen to them wherever you want.  The easiest way to add the show is by using the direct RSS feed: http://wimdemeere.libsyn.com/rss
  • If you like the podcast, please share it on your site or social media. That helps me tremendously, thank you.

Enough talk, here’s the first episode:

Show notes:

Thanks for listening!

Please like, share and leave a review!

If you want to support the podcast while also getting access to loads of unique content, go to my Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/wimdemeere

 

The Leg Kick, the Bouncer’s Secret Weapon

Back in the early 1980’s, I was first introduced to the combat sport of muay Thai. I was already training in traditional martial arts, but what these fighters were doing was new to me: they kicked using their shins and did so full power. What’s more, they didn’t use any shin guards, which was unusual at the time. The most peculiar technique was one that looked like a sloppy soccer kick aimed at the opponent’s upper leg. It didn’t make sense to me but, as an inquisitive young man, it didn’t take me long to start experimenting and learning as much as I could about “The Art of Eight Limbs.”

I soon discovered a few things:

  • That soccer kick was called a “leg kick” or “low kick” and it hurt like hell when it landed.
  • Though it looks easy to do, it is an extremely difficult technique to master and use correctly.

With lots of training and patience, the leg kick eventually became one of my favorite techniques. I’ve used it on numerous occasions, both inside and outside of a combat sports context and can attest to its effectiveness. Thanks to the help of other practitioners and instructors I met along the way, I made a lot of progress refining the leg kick and learned to apply it using different effective tactics. One of these instructors had a particularly interesting take on the leg kick and I’d like to share it with you here. I’m going to refer to my book here for more in-depth information, so if you haven’t got it yet, you can buy it here:

The Leg Kick: Your Ultimate Guide to Using The Leg Kick for Mixed Martial Arts

For all the details on the leg kick, go here.

He was a bouncer and used the leg kick to handle certain types of conflicts that were about to escalate into violence. In fact, he turned it into a handy (though nasty…) little trick to calm down the kind of patrons who were too young to know the true dangers of violence, but too old not to take seriously. I’ll explain the trick at the end, but first some thoughts on the technical details:

  • He used the half-hip turn instead of the full hip turn. This allowed him a faster delivery, non-telegraphic movement and the ability to strike from his de-escalation stance (which had the kicking leg slightly to the back.)
  • The retraction is just as important. His leg would explode into the kick, but he paid equal attention to retracting it right away. That way he was able to get back to either his de-escalation stance if he got the result he wanted, or flow into a fighting stance to follow-up with appropriate techniques.
  • Follow-up. When the kick was delivered correctly, the patron dropped to the floor or bent over to clutch his leg. But just in case something went wrong, he always brought his hands up as he retracted his leg, ready to strike, defend or control the patron or any others who might want to intervene.
  • Appropriate targeting. Given the trick he used, he didn’t aim for the knee as that joint and its ligaments will tear and snap when struck with sufficient force. Nobody wants to pay for expensive surgery if law enforcement gets involved after the incident. Instead, he aimed for the sciatic nerve. When properly hit, it shuts people down and they tend to fall or limp heavily. As such a technique attacks the nervous system directly, it tends to override whatever mindset they were in the moment before and usually adjusts their attitude for the better. At the very least, they are in no position to think of attacking.

He had great success working with the leg kick like this and still uses the technique.

 

Why use the leg kick as a bouncer?

Hitting a patron in the head can end badly for both you and him. If you breaks his nose, teeth or orbital bone, you might be up on charges and pay heavy medical costs along with facing a lawsuit. If you knock him out and he cracks his skull on the floor as he falls, he could end up in a coma or in the morgue. that would mean a court date for you, tens of thousands of dollars in legal fees and if convicted, years in prison for manslaughter.

The benefit of the leg kick is that it avoids cosmetic damage to the face, so you don’t have to worry about those medical costs. If the patron falls, he is generally conscious and instinctively tries to catch his fall using his arms and hands. In most cases, he doesn’t suffer serious injuries. At worst, you break or fracture his femur, which though painful is typically not a lethal injury.

But most of all: the owner of the establishment needs his patrons to return to spend more money in his place. If they see you smashing in faces, they will more than likely take their business elsewhere and you will eventually be out of a job. Kicking them in the leg, though painful and embarrassing if they limp away, is usually not seen as perceived as excessive violence. So bystanders might actually give beneficial testimony if the police investigate what happened.

That said, you still have to be justified in your use of force. Case in point:

This video shows a bouncer being effective with the technique, but you could argue if kicking the patron was the right choice.

All that said, the leg kick is just another tool in the toolbox: use it when appropriate, leave it alone when it’s not.

 

The trick that bouncer used to make the leg kick his secret weapon?

Underneath his trousers, worn in such a way nobody could spot it, he wore field hockey shin guards like this:

The Leg Kick, the Bouncer's Secret Weapon

Hard, field hockey shin guards

These are made out of a hard exterior shell and a soft, padded lining on the inside. They are usually long enough to cover your entire shin, which means that if you leg kick somebody while wearing them, it feels like getting hit with a baseball bat made out of steel.

I did mention that the trick was nasty…

The best part is that to the other patrons, it looks like the bouncer just dropped a guy with a kick that shouldn’t have packed that much power. Sure, it was fast, but it wasn’t a big move. In their minds, it creates a narrative of “Damn, that dude hits hard!” followed right along with a bunch of reasons why they better not mess with him. As a result, the need for more violence was often averted. Not always though and you need to know when the leg kick is not the right way to go, but that’s beyond the topic of this article.

Fun side-benefit: you can block certain kicks with your shin without sustaining damage, so this trick is not just good for offense.

 

Making it work.

Start by finding a shin guard that fits you well. They have to be comfortable as you wear them for hours on end during a shift. That’s why I suggest spending a bit more and getting shin guards that allow some airflow to avoid profuse sweating and the rashes that can come from it. This obviously also means you take care of them after each use, cleaning them out and letting them dry completely. I suggest starting your search here and also here.

Wear the right pair of trousers so they stay hidden. Depending on the dress code of your establishment, this might be a frustrating challenge and take some experimenting. Do it anyway, because it’s of little use to give away your secret trick by making it obvious for all to see you’re wearing those shin guards.

On a final note:

Another bouncer didn’t think the shin guards were hard enough to get consistent results, so he rigged them for better performance:

He attached several steel corner brackets to the shin guard with the edge of the corners facing outward. This took some tinkering to get it right, but eventually, he did. As a result, he would kick unruly patrons real fast, just once, and everybody he kicked went down after just one strike. It tended to impress the other patrons to the point of quieting down any other brooding fight that was ready to boil over.

As far as I know, nobody ever figured out his secret.

My new book: The Leg Kick for Mixed Martial Arts

And here it is! My new book, The Leg Kick: Your Ultimate Guide to Using The Leg Kick for Mixed Martial Arts, is available as of right now. If you want to read all the details on what it’s about, read this blog post.

The Leg Kick: Your Ultimate Guide to Using The Leg Kick for Mixed Martial Arts

The Leg Kick: Your Ultimate Guide to Using The Leg Kick for Mixed Martial Arts

You can get the book in paperback and electronic version at Amazon and the other retailers in this list here below.

Available:

Coming soon:

  • Inktera

There are two bonuses that come with this book:

  • The first 100 buyers who send me a message via my Facebook Page can get access to a private Facebook group. In that group, I will give additional information to help you use the information in the book: pictures, additional techniques, instructional videos, video analysis of MMA fights in which the leg kick is used, you can ask questions and much more. This is first come, first served, so best not delay if you are interested in this.

Also, you will keep your access to the group once I finish posting all the content there. Important: you obviously need a Facebook account to be eligible for this and I will ask proof of purchase via email.

  • There is a resources page to which I repeatedly refer to in the book. You can find it here. There you can find additional information, some videos and links to the gear I recommend for your training. This page is free for all to enjoy.

 

It took much longer than I wanted to write this book, but it’s finally here. I hope you enjoy it and can use the information to improve your own skills.

 

I have one small favor to ask:

Please leave a review on Amazon. Just give your honest opinion, what you liked, didn’t like, etc. It doesn’t even have the be a long review, just a few lines is already better than nothing.

Reviews make a huge difference in improving sales of a book. I would greatly appreciate it you woudl take the time to write one. Thank you.

 

Finally, I’ve already started writing the next book: Boxing for Self-Defense. If all goes well, it will be released in December near the holiday season. If you want to be notified when it does, sign up here. No spam, just an email when there’s a new product.

 

Thank you for your support.

Charlottesville and what comes next

I didn’t watch the news yesterday evening so I only found out about what happened in Charlottesville this morning. I did some checking, saw what some of my friends were saying and decided to post this article. It’s from the Patreon Newsletter I wrote in March. I edited it slightly for clarity and added a few things.

Here goes:

******

Violence in Modern Society

For the last few years I’ve posted videos and articles, mostly on my blog and Facebook page, that weren’t about self-defense per se but more about trends in our modern, Western societies. Some of the feedback I got was along the lines of “What the hell are you talking about?” so I thought it might not be a bad idea for me to explain myself a bit. Here goes.

The last twenty years have seen many changes in not only the entire world, but in particular in Western societies and most notably in the US. I will focus on the latter, but have seen similar things happen in the EU where I live. I think it’s a universal trend as opposed to an isolated one. The picture is complex and I need to put several pieces of the puzzle on the table before it makes sense.

One piece of that puzzle is terrorism:

  • First and foremost, 9/11 happened some fifteen years ago and it changed the world as well as the American government, its policies and its society.
  • France and Belgium had their own 9/11 these last few years with the Paris and Brussels attacks.
  • Germany had numerous attacks in the Summer of 2016. Though there were less casualties in total, the frequency was higher and the attacks perhaps more brutal (though we can argue about that.)
  • The UK also had its share of terrorist attacks, with again, relatively speaking less victims but in a more personal (and therefor more frighting) manner.
  • Since then, numerous terrorist attacks have been thwarted in several EU countries. This information rarely makes the news and when it does, it is routinely ignored by the media because it scares the readers and viewers.

A second piece is the rise of social media and alternative media channels:

  • Facebook and Twitter became dominant platforms. They offer instant, worldwide communication via text, audio and video. This has positive and negative consequences, which I won’t go into here. The point is that news, fake or otherwise, goes global in an instant and can be seen by anybody with an internet connection, be they rich or poor, smart or stupid, etc. This is unprecedented in human history.
  • Any message can go viral, regardless of significance or time frame. For instance, one man live-Tweeted the raid on Osama Bin Laden. Only afterwards did he realize the significance of what he tweeted. Another example is the live video broadcast on Facebook of the torture of a young man. This led to arrests and a debate on racism, violence and society in general.
  • An argument can be made that humans have not yet figured out how to handle this flood of information and disinformation. We also don’t know how things will evolve in the future, but these issues are unlikely to go away.

The third piece is the advent of extreme positions in academia and lobby groups, in particular since the latest US elections: [Read more…]