Podcast episode 31: The three most common mistakes students make and how to avoid them

In this episode, I take a closer look at the three most common mistakes students make in martial arts and self-defense classes. I’ve been teaching for a long time and have consistently seen these come up. They can be avoided though, which is what I also discuss here.

Enjoy!

1) Introduction

2) The three most common mistakes students make and how to avoid them

Podcast episode 31 The three most common mistakes students make and how to avoid them

 

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Please like, share and leave a review!

Please support the podcast and get access to loads of unique content in return:

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Podcast episode 30: Interview with Dr. Alexis Artwohl

This is perhaps one of the best episodes of the podcast I’ve done so far. I spent about 1h45min. talking to Dr. Alexis Artwohl and she generously shared her expertise on training for lethal force incidents, dealing with the aftermath and PTSD among other topics. She has also agreed to come back on the show later this year, so we have a lot to look forward to.

Enjoy!

Podcast interview with Dr Alexis Artwohl on lethal force, preparation, resilience and PTSD

Dr. Alexis Artwohl

1) Introduction

2) Preparing for a lethal force incident

3) Resilience

Dr. Artwohl’s website

Thanks for listening!

Please like, share and leave a review!

Please support the podcast and get access to loads of unique content in return:

https://www.patreon.com/wimdemeere

Subscribe to the podcast and automatically get the latest episode:

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Patreon Overview: November 2018 – Februari 2019

Here’s another update for the content I created exclusively for my Patreon supporters, covering November 2018 until February of this year.

My Patreon page is where I post exclusive content not available elsewhere. There is now over 37.5 hours video material and this library grows by about 75 minutes every month.  That’s without the monthly 1-hour Livestream hangout we do in our private Facebook group, which are afterwards also available for re-viewing. The best part about Patreon is that you get full access immediately after joining, so get a drink or two ready and dive in. :-)

There was a lot going on these last few months, not least of which was the special offer I did on my Stretching and Mobility Exercises for Martial Arts and Self-Defense video. That took a lot of work and some last minute juggling of several problems, but I’m very happy with the result. It helped me achieve one of my goals for last year, getting my first 50 Patrons. These Founding Fifty will keep on getting unique perks and rewards for as long as they stay a Patron. Admittance to this group is now closed forever.

I have another idea for a special in the works. I’ll announce it on my Patreon page and social media once we’re good to go.

As for what we were up to on Patreon, you can see every post by month here. November, December, January and Februari Just scroll down the page to see everything, including the posts on my timeline that I don’t mention here.

Click on the text links below to see all the videos in each category:

Violence analysis

Instructional video

Quick Q&A

30min. Q&A

For a quick visual representation, here are all the videos I made.

Patreon videos overview Wim Demeere - martial arts self-defense violence analysis

If you want to join us there and support my blog and podcast, head on over and sign up at whatever reward tier works for you.

Podcast episode 29: Which podcasts do I listen to?

I took a bit of a break from podcasting, but am back on track now. In this episode, I talk about the different podcasts I listen to and recommend for various reasons.
Enjoy!

1) Updates

2) Which podcasts do I like?

3) Next episode: an interview with Dr. Alexis Artwohl

Thanks for listening!

Please like, share and leave a review!

Please support the podcast and get access to loads of unique content in return:

https://www.patreon.com/wimdemeere

Subscribe to the podcast and automatically get the latest episode:

Spotify

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Self-defense, perspectives on it and the nature of learning

One of my students has led an interesting life. Some of the things he’s done:
  • He went jogging on the West Bank and was shot at as a result. He’s not Jewish, but he resembles one a bit through the scope of a sniper rifle.
  • A child soldier, high as a kite on sniffing glue, pointed an AK-47 at him and accused him of being a spy. He then talked his way out if it.
  • African villagers almost slaughtered him and his companion after the companion drove over a goat that belonged to a local (for whom selling its milk was that guy’s only source of income…) He did the right thing to defuse the situaiton and they got invited to the feast where the goat would be shared by all.
  • He got violently ambushed by a gang on a remote road in Asia and got him and his girlfriend out of it and to safety.
  • There’s more, but I’ll leave it at that.
 
Despite all this, he still doubts his self-defense skills.
 
My response during a call earlier today was that a large portion of Westerners would be in therapy for years after just one of those incidents, let alone several.
He doesn’t even think about it anymore.
Self-defense, perspective and learning
There are two points I’d like to make:
  • Self-defense is in many ways a matter of perspective. When faced with coming this close to getting murdered, some people never fully recover after they make it through. Others do so without any lasting consequences. These are two extremes, on opposite ends of the scale of possibilities. There is a lot of middle ground. Where we all fall on that spectrum depends on many factors. The point is that there is more than one truth when it comes to trauma when facing violence, recovery, and PTSD.
  • Violence is a broad topic. There are many aspects of it that apply across the globe and are found in all cultures. But there are also lots of differences and these matter just as much. Those of you who’ve been following me for a while have heard that before
    It then follows that nobody is an expert on violence as a whole. Experiences and training are individual. They don’t necessarily apply across the board. I can’t count the number of times I thought things were a certain way and then, later on, found out I was wrong. Case in point. I assume this will continue to happen. Hopefully, the mistakes will become fewer and with more time in between. Achieving that would be an achievement in its own right, as I’d like to continue learning until I die.

 

Conclusion

Everybody lives a unique life. One that comes with a unique perspective on self-defense, depending on the accumulated sum of those personal experiences. Each of us has an individual truth about self-defense as a result. When your truth conflicts with mine, that doesn’t automatically invalidate either (or both) of them.  The trick is figuring out what you can learn, which aspects you can translate to your own context and what is not applicable at all.

If any of you ever fully figure out that trick, let me know…

 

P.S.: First, many of you have asked so here’s an update. I’m currently writing the last chapter of my Boxing For Self-Defense book. I hope to finish it this week and then the editing and formatting can begin. When I have a release date, I’ll anounce it here and on my social media.

The second most asked question on this: it will be a three volume series of books. There is too much information to cover and cramming it in one book would force me to price it too high for most people. I want my stuff to be afordable and reasonably priced. I don’t know when the other two volumes will be released, given as I still have to write them…